Port Dauphin Naval Base Military Memorial

Port Dauphin, 1755 map of the English empire in North America -6

Photographs of
Port Dauphin NavalBase Military Memorial

1713 – 1758

Strongly fortified by the Government of France


Port Dauphin (Englishtown), Port Toulouse (St. Peter’s), and Louisbourg
were the three main settlements in Ile Royale (Cape Breton Island)
at this time (1713-1758). Originally Port Dauphin was chosen as the
administrative centre, but by 1717 Louisbourg had become the capital.

Englishtown Victoria County Nova Scotia

Located on the north side of the highway

GPS location: 46°17’14″N 60°32’25″W

Port Dauphin Naval Base 1713-1719

Photographed on 26 June 2003

Port Dauphin Naval Base 1713-1719

Photographed on 26 June 2003

Port Dauphin Naval Base 1713-1719 Plaque date: 1950

Photographed on 26 June 2003

Port Dauphin, 1755 map of Fort Dauphin, Cape Breton Island
1755 map of Fort Dauphin, Cape Breton Island

1755 map of the English Empire in North America
A new and accurate map of the English empire in North America;
Representing their rightful claim as confirmed by charters
and the formal surrender of their Indian friends;
likewise the encroachments of the French, with the
several forts they have unjustly erected therein
London, 1755

Map source: Library of Congress Geography and Map Division, Washington, D.C., U.S.A.
A new and accurate map of the English empire in North America…
London, 1755
http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.gmd/g3300.ar006200

The whole map (below) — the red rectangles show the areas enlarged (above).
Port Dauphin, 1755 map of the English empire in North America
1755 map of the English Empire in North America

Reference: Another view of

A Plan of Port Dauphin on the Isle of Cape Briton

University of Southern Maine, Portland, Maine

Reference: Another view of the whole map

A new and accurate map of the English empire in North America…

University of Southern Maine, Portland, Maine

Reference: Maps of 18th Century America, another view of the whole map

A new and accurate map of the English empire in North America…

University of San Diego, California

Reference:
A new and accurate map of the English empire in North America…
Library and Archives Canada, NMC 21053
(This online image is presented in MrSid, an obsolete format no longer supported by its developer, and the URL is a complex address that cannot be linked here because it is rejected by the W3C Validator.)

Reference:
MapHist by Peter van der Krogt
E-mail discussion group on the history of cartography

Port Dauphin (population 9600)
is surrendered to England at 8am, 27 July 1758

Page 199
Article IV. — The Porte Dauphine shall be delivered up to His Britannic Majesty’s troops at eight o’clock to-morrow morning, and the garrison, comprehending all those who have carried arms, shall be drawn up at noon upon the Esplanade, and lay down their arms, colours, implements, and ornaments of war: and the garrison shall be embarked to be sent to England in a convenient time.
Article V. — The same care shall be taken of the sick and wounded which are in the hospitals, as those of his Britannic Majesty.
Article VI. — The merchants and their clerks, who have not borne arms, shall be transmitted to France in such manner as the Admiral shall judge proper.
Done at Louisbourg the 26th of July, 1758.
Signed — De Drucour…


Augustin de Boschenry de Drucour
Dictionary of Canadian Biography

Augustin de Boschenry de Drucour
by Peter Landry

page 199: Historical Journal, by John Knox, 1769

Source: United States Library of Congress
Rare Book and Special Collections Division

Historical journal of the campaigns in North-America, for the years 1757, 1758, 1759, and1760…

by Captain John Knox, 1769

Title page: Historical Journal, by John Knox, 1769

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