Freight Train to New Minas
Nova Scotia

Windsor & Hantsport Railway

Wednesday, 27 June 2007


On 17 August 2007, the last train operated over the track between Hantsport and New Minas.






Also see:
Train to New Minas, 15 June 2007
Train to New Minas, 22 June 2007
Last Train to Windsor Junction, 2 Nov. 2010


W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Windsor, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   4:26pm

Making up the train for New Minas, in the Windsor railyard.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Windsor, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   4:33pm

With the brake test completed, the train starts its run to New Minas.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Windsor, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   4:34pm

The train heads westward onto the track across the Avon River Causeway, the old Dominion Atlantic Railway main line between Yarmouth and Halifax.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Hantsport, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   4:53pm

The train stops in Hantsport, to align the track switch to the main line.  This switch is usually set for the siding, so that incoming loaded gypsum trains, heading into the siding, are not forced to stop to realign the switch.  Several photographers and videographers are following this train.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Hantsport, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   4:54pm

With the track switch aligned for the main, the train starts forward toward Wolfville, Greenwich and New Minas.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Hantsport, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   4:54pm

Passing the Hantsport station.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Blue Beach, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   5:11pm

Blue Beach Road.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Horton Landing, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   5:27pm

A load of hay at the Wharf Road crossing in Horton Landing, a few minutes before the train arrives.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Avonport, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   5:30pm

The train crosses the tidal flood plain at Avonport, approaching the Gaspereau River bridge.  This is a long-distance view, shot at maximum zoom.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Horton Landing, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   5:35pm

We see the whole train at the Wharf Road crossing at Horton Landing, mileage 44.85 of the Halifax Subdivision.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Horton Landing, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   5:36pm

In the background we see mud flats at low tide, where the Gaspereau River flows into Minas Basin, an arm of the Bay of Fundy.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Wolfville, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   6:03pm

At the Elm Avenue crossing at Wolfville, mileage 49.15 of the Halifax Subdivision – passing the old Wolfville railway station, now the Wolfville Public Library.

Until recently this crossing did not have electric warning signals, it was protected only by plain crossbuck signs.  After the track through Kentville was abandoned in September 1993, the electric warning signal system, that had been installed in Kentville at the Cornwallis Street crossing, mileage 56.09 of the Halifax Subdivision, was removed and reinstalled here at the Elm Avenue crossing in Wolfville.  Vehicle traffic along Elm Avenue, over this crossing, has markedly increased in recent years because of the construction of new buildings north of the railway, and there was a need for better warning signals.
Go to:   Crossbuck



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Greenwich, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   6:13pm

Photographers and videographers get a visual record of this soon-to-disappear transportation infrastructure.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Greenwich, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   6:13pm

The conductor steps off the train at the siding switch.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Greenwich, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   6:14pm

The train moves forward over the Highway 358 crossing at Greenwich, mileage 50.91 of the Halifax Subdivision.  The conductor is positioned at the siding switch.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Greenwich, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   6:15pm

As the train slowly moves forward, the conductor uses his radio to tell the driver when to stop.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Greenwich, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   6:15pm

The train stops and holds the crossing.  The conductor releases the foot-lock at the base of the rail.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Greenwich, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   6:15pm

The switch is thrown to the siding.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Greenwich, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   6:15pm

The conductor removes the FRED, in preparation for switching.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Greenwich, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   6:19pm

The train pushes back into the siding.  The three empty grain hoppers that were standing at the auger have been pushed back (eastward, away from the camera, and out of sight in this view), ready to be taken away when the train comes back on its return trip.

The train is now clear of the track signal circuit, and the warning signals have stopped operation, thus allowing highway traffic to proceed over the crossing.  For a train on the main line track, this close to the highway crossing, the warning signals would be operating – but this train is on the siding, and the rules for the warning signals are different.  The warning signal circuits are interconnected with the track switch.  When the track switch is thrown to the siding, the signal circuits are reconnected.  For a train on the main line track there are approach circuits that activate the flashing warning lights well in advance of the train's arrival at the crossing – the length of the track that is included in each approach circuit is calculated to give twenty seconds of warning for a train running at the track speed limit.  For sidings and spurs, on which a train will be operating at low speed, no approach circuit is provided – the only track circuit includes the full width of the highway crossing travelled way, and a few metres on each side.  The warning signals (flashing red lights and a bell) will be activated only when the train's leading axle enters the circuited track, that is when the leading axle is within a few metres of the edge of the travelled way.  This arrangement is the best possible to allow the train to perform its switching work with a minimum of disruption of vehicle movements, but it requires that every train must approach the crossing at low speed, and that the train crew ensures that the warning signals are activated for at least seven seconds before the train occupies the crossing.



W&HR: Insulated rail joints, Greenwich, Nova Scotia

Excerpt from above photograph, showing the insulated rail joints

W&HR: Insulated rail joints, Greenwich, Nova Scotia

Greenwich, Monday, 9 July 2007   6:18am

These insulated rail joints are located about five metres east of the Highway 358 crossing at Greenwich.  For a train on the siding, like this one, the warning signals will cease operation as soon as the train exits the crossing circuit by moving east of these joints.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Greenwich, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   6:22pm

The train pulls forward onto the crossing, just far enough to place the cut of three loaded grain hoppers at the consignee's auger, and stops to allow the conductor to apply the handbrake and uncouple the cut.

The train is now occupying the track signal circuit, and the warning signals are operating.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Greenwich, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   6:23pm

Tim Jolly is driving the train.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Greenwich, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   6:24pm

The train pulls out of the west end of the siding, leaving behind four carloads of animal feed grain.  A cut of three loaded cars is spotted at one auger.  The fourth load of grain stands separate; on the train's return trip it will enter the siding from the east end to place this car on the spur at the other auger, and to take out the empty cars.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Greenwich, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   6:25pm

The train has completed its switching here.  The conductor is throwing the track switch back to the main line.  A considerable effort is required to get the last little bit of movement on the switch handle, to turn it far enough to drop into the locking position.  The yellow object on the ground beside the conductor's left foot is the FRED.

Here, we have a clear view of the insulated joint in the far rail, and a partial view of the insulated joint in the near rail.  Note that these insulated joints are slightly staggered – the far joint is located a foot or so farther east than the near joint.  This is normal.  The electric warning signal system is designed to work properly when one wheel on an axle crosses the circuit boundary slightly ahead of, or beyond the other wheel on the same axle — which for a time makes an electrical connection between one rail in a track circuit and the other rail in the adjacent track circuit.  This is a design requirement for warning signal circuits; it is not feasible to place these insulated joints so precisely that a pair of wheels will cross both joints simultaneously.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Greenwich, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   6:25pm

The switch linkage is adjusted to bring the rail point tight against the running rail – requiring a considerable effort to get the last little bit of movement on the switch handle, to turn it far enough to drop into the locking position.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Greenwich, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   6:26pm

Ready for the trip to New Minas with five loaded grain hoppers, the train is standing clear of the crossing, waiting for the conductor.  He has thrown and locked the track switch at the west end of the siding, and now walks to the head end.

The train is now standing on a track signal circuit, but the warning signals are not operating and highway traffic is proceeding normally over the crossing (behind the camera).  Railway crossing signals are designed with an approach circuit on both sides of the crossing.  For a train headed west, like this one, when the east approach circuit is occupied the warning signals are activated, but after the train has moved far enough west to clear the crossing, the warning signals are cancelled even though the west approach circuit is occupied.  The west approach circuit is deactivated until the train moves far enough westward (a few hundred metres) for the trailing axle to move beyond the circuited track.  The signal circuits then reset, and are ready for the next train, no matter in which direction it may be travelling.  The warning signals cannot assume that after a westbound train has passed, the next train will be eastbound.



W&HR: Insulated rail joints, Greenwich, Nova Scotia

Excerpt from above photograph, enhanced to show details in shadow.  Note the train crew's precise placement of the train, just far enough west to cancel the highway warning signals.  The wheel on the near rail has not quite exited the crossing circuit (it has stopped a few centimetres short of the rail joint), but the wheel on the far rail has exited the crossing circuit, thus cancelling the warning signals for highway traffic.

W&HR: Insulated rail joints, Greenwich, Nova Scotia

Greenwich, Monday, 9 July 2007   6:20am

The train (above) is standing with its trailing axle a short distance west of the insulated joint in the far rail, located about two metres west of the Highway 358 crossing at Greenwich.  For a westbound train, like this one, the warning signals will cease operation as soon as the trailing axle breaks the crossing circuit by moving beyond the first of these joints.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

New Minas, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   6:37pm

At New Minas, the train is entering the ACA Co-op siding, at the 3-track crossing of Minas Warehouse Road, mileage 52.50 [84.47km] on the Halifax Subdivision.  In this photograph, only two tracks are visible; the ACA Co-op siding (the far track) and the main line (the near track).  The third track (the Frito-Lay spur) is too close to the camera to be visible in this view.

Note that the warning signal flashing red lights are not yet operating.  For a train on the main line track (the nearest track in this photograph), there are approach circuits that activate the flashing warning lights well in advance of the train's arrival at the crossing – the length of the track that is included in each approach circuit is calculated to give twenty seconds of warning for a train running at the track speed limit.  For sidings and spurs, on which a train will be operating at low speed, no approach circuit is provided – the only track circuit includes the full width of the highway crossing travelled way, and about two to three metres on each side.  The warning signals (flashing red lights and a bell) will be activated only when the train's leading axle enters the circuited track, that is when the leading axle is within two to three metres of the edge of the travelled way.  This arrangement is the best possible to allow the train to perform its switching work with a minimum of disruption of vehicle movements, but it requires that every train must approach the crossing at low speed, and that the train crew ensures that the warning signals are activated for at least seven seconds before the train occupies the crossing.
Go to:   Highway Crossings Protective Devices Regulations
Canadian Transport Commission



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

New Minas, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   6:38pm

The diesel-electric locomotives pull the incoming loads westward along the ACA Co-op siding.  The hopper car at the front of the engines is CNWX 111515, loaded with grain   It was delivered to this siding last week, but has not yet been unloaded.  Hopper CNWX 111515 will be pushed through the siding, with the five empty hoppers, out onto the main line.  Before the train crew leaves, this car will be put back onto the ACA Co-op siding so that it can be unloaded.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

New Minas, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   6:51pm

The incoming loads (one is visible at the left side of this photograph) have been uncoupled from the engines and are parked on the siding.  The engines are moving westward (away from the camera), pushing six cars ahead (five are visible in this view), down the steep grade at the west end of the siding, toward the connection to the main line.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

New Minas, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   6:51pm

The engines are moving westward (away from the camera), pushing six cars ahead (only two are visible in this view), down the steep grade at the west end of the siding, toward the connection to the main line.  They will come back along the main line (the curved track seen in the foreground), a stiff uphill grade coming toward the camera.  This is the old Dominion Atlantic Railway main line track between Yarmouth and Halifax – it carried daily passenger trains for more than a hundred years, until 15 January 1990.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

New Minas, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   6:56pm

The engines have been reversed, so that the forward direction is now eastward toward Windsor, and are approaching on the main line.  The cut of five hoppers standing on the siding are the loads that were brought today from Windsor.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

New Minas, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   6:58pm

The five empties have been uncoupled and are now parked on the main line.  The engines are moving eastward (toward the camera) with loaded hopper CNWX 111515, which must be put back on the siding for unloading.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

New Minas, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   6:58pm

Cylindrical hopper CNWX 111515 will be parked here, at the top of the grade on the main line just clear of the switch at the east end of the siding, while the engines pull out the cut of five loads now standing on the siding.  CNWX 111515 will be coupled at the west end of the cut, and the six hoppers will then be parked on the siding close to the ACA Co-op dumping shed.

Cars labelled with the reporting mark CNWX are owned by the Canadian Wheat Board (a federal government agency) and provided at no cost to CN to help move grain.  The Canadian Government is currently trying to sell these cars.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

New Minas, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   7:00pm

The five empty hoppers stand on the main line (beyond the videographer), while the five incoming loads (four are visible in this view) wait on the siding.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

New Minas, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   7:02pm

The crossing warning signals are in operation as the engines move westward (toward the right in this view) on the ACA Co-op siding, to get the cut of five loads of grain that have just arrived from Windsor.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

New Minas, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   7:09pm

The five incoming hoppers have been pulled eastward to the main line, and hopper CNWX 111515 has been coupled to the end of the cut.  Here, the cut of six loaded hoppers is being spotted at the dumping shed on the ACA Co-op siding.  The engines are clear of the crossing track circuit and the warning signals are stopped, allowing vehicles to move along Minas Warehouse Road while this switching move is completed and the six hoppers are parked.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

New Minas, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   7:12pm

With the switching completed on the ACA Co-op siding, the engines roll eastward toward the main line.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

New Minas, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   7:14pm

On the main line track, the engines couple with the cut of five empties to be taken eastward to Windsor and then to the CN interchange at Windsor Junction.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

New Minas, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   7:15pm

With all switching work completed here at New Minas, the train starts eastward.  The track in the foreground, branching from the main line, is the Frito-Lay spur.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Greenwich, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   7:21pm

As the Sun sets slowly in the west (behind the camera), shadows creep toward the Greenwich siding, where the incoming loads (the near cut of three hoppers) have been spotted at the consignee's auger, and outgoing empties (the two dark green hoppers in the far cut of four cars) wait to be taken away.  The eastbound train, now on its way from New Minas, will go to the switch at the far end of the siding.  Leaving the five empties from New Minas standing on the main, the engines will back into the siding to get the outgoing empties.  In the cut of four hoppers, the two empties will have to be separated from the two loads.  Then these two empties, and a third empty hopper on the spur that is out of sight in this view, will be taken onto the main line and coupled into the eastbound train.  These switching moves will be done well away from the highway crossing, beyond the track signal circuit, with no disturbance to highway traffic.  The train will leave Greenwich with eight empty grain hoppers, five from New Minas and three from Greenwich.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Greenwich, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   7:23pm

The eastbound train approaches Greenwich at the Highway 358 crossing, mileage 50.91 of the Halifax Subdivision.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Greenwich, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   7:24pm

The eastbound train approaching Greenwich with five empty hopper cars from New Minas.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Wolfville, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   7:33pm

Warning signals at the Harbourside Drive crossing in Wolfville, mileage 48.95 [78.76km] of the Halifax Subdivision.  This set of electric warning signals is brand-new, installed so recently that the old crossbuck with a simple hexagonal stop sign is still in place.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Wolfville, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   7:58pm

The train stops at the Harbourside Drive crossing in Wolfville.

Railcars labelled with the reporting mark AGPX belong to a fleet of more than 3,000 railcars owned by Ag Processing Incorporated, a farmer-owned cooperative based in Omaha, Nebraska.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Wolfville, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   8:01pm

After stopping for a few minutes, the train starts across Harbourside Drive.  The new electric warning signals are working.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Horton Landing, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   8:22pm

The train approaches the Wharf Road crossing at Horton Landing, mileage 44.85 [72.16km] of the Halifax Subdivision.  The two automobiles brought photographers who have taken positions (out of sight in this photograph) that allow a good view of the bridge across the Gaspereau River.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Horton Landing, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   8:23pm

As the train goes down the grade approaching the Gaspereau River bridge, we see the whole train of eight empty grain hoppers, the three from Greenwich in front, followed by the five from New Minas.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Hantsport, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   8:55pm

In the gathering darkness, 21 empty gondolas stand at Hantsport ready to be taken east to be filled with gypsum.  Earlier today, three trainloads of gypsum were delivered here, to be exported by boat.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Hantsport, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   9:01pm

The headlights of the approaching train illuminate the gypsum gondolas.  This photograph was taken from the platform of the Hantsport station.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Hantsport, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   9:02pm

The train passes the Hantsport station and crosses William Street.  We can see that the warning lights at the William Street crossing are working.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Falmouth, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   9:20pm

The train approaches the Falmouth Connector overpass in very dim light.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007

Windsor, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   9:27pm

It is nearly dark as the train approaches the end of its run at the Windsor railyard.





Epilogue



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007, epilogue

Greenwich, Thursday, 28 June 2007   3:35pm

Four hoppers loaded with animal feed grain stand on the siding at Greenwich, and a fifth load (not visible in this view) is on the spur.  The three near hoppers arrived in the June 27th train, and the other two arrived previously.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007, epilogue

Greenwich, Tuesday, 03 July 2007   6:08pm

Four hoppers loaded with animal feed grain stand on the siding at Greenwich.  These are the same four cars seen in the photograph (next above) taken five days earlier, but they have been moved a short distance by the consignee to facilitate the unloading of the grain.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007, epilogue

New Minas, Tuesday, 03 July 2007   6:16pm

Six grain hoppers stand on the ACA Co-op siding at New Minas.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007, epilogue

New Minas, Tuesday, 03 July 2007   6:18pm

There is a serious problem with this track.  Note how close the outer edge of this wheel tread is to the inner edge of the rail.  The rails have spread, and the gauge has widened to the point that there is danger of a derailment simply by the wheel dropping off of the rail.  This is in a siding, and trains travel along here always at a very low speed, not much more than a walking pace, so there is no danger of any serious accident – if a derailment here be could accurately be called an "accident" – and there is no hazard to the public.

Railway track consists of two parallel rails that should be held at a prescribed distance apart by wood ties.  Track gauge measures the width between the inside faces of the two parallel rails.  "Gauge spread" is a phenomenon well known in the railway industry.  With age, in unmaintained track the rails tend to move further apart.  This increased distance is known as gauge spread. The standard track gauge in Canada, (and in many other countries), is 1435mm ± 30mm.  That is, trains can safely run on a track with a gauge spread tolerance of 30mm.  Gauge spread refers to the distance between the rails slowly increasing as heavy traffic passes.  If allowed to continue long enough (years) the rails will eventually move far enough apart that the train wheels will drop between the rails.  It is well known within the railway industry that gauge spread can cause derailments; indeed it was the single most common cause of derailments in 2001/2002 in Great Britain – during the period 1 April 2000 to 31 March 2001 there were 29 derailments due to gauge spread.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007, epilogue

New Minas, Tuesday, 03 July 2007   6:20pm

The hopper car nearest to the camera is CNWX 111515, the westernmost car in the cut of five grain hoppers at the dumping shed on the ACA Co-op siding at New Minas.  The west axle is only two metres from the derail (the yellow-painted iron device clamped to the right-hand rail).  The derail is locked in place by a standard switch lock – it can be released only by members of the train crew at the time when a train is operated along this track.  This derail marks the limit of the track available to Co-op employees when they move grain cars back and forth along the siding to place one hopper or another at the required unloading location.  This is the reason why the Co-op can receive no more than five cars at any one time, for unloading at the dumping shed.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007, epilogue

New Minas, Tuesday, 03 July 2007   6:21pm

Another view of the derail.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007, epilogue

New Minas, Wednesday, 27 June 2007   6:40am

Close-up view of the derail.  Obviously there has been some action here; the scarred paint clearly shows that at least one car has been derailed here, probably some time ago judging by the lack of indications on the ground.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007, epilogue

New Minas, Tuesday, 03 July 2007   6:22pm

Looking westward from the derail, down the west end of the siding toward the switch at the connection to the main line track.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007, epilogue

New Minas, Tuesday, 03 July 2007   6:25pm

From the switch at the west end of the ACA Co-op siding, looking eastward toward the hopper cars standing on the siding.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007, epilogue

New Minas, Tuesday, 03 July 2007   6:26pm

Looking eastward along the main line.  Note the numerous new ties, installed in this track earlier this year.  This is the end of the line for train operations — trains proceed westward (toward the camera) only far enough to clear the track switch, so it can be thrown to the alignment required for switching work.

The old main line track still exists for a few kilometres westward (as far as the east boundary of the Town of Kentville) but there has been no traffic beyond this point for years.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007, epilogue

New Minas, Tuesday, 03 July 2007   6:28pm

Looking eastward along the main line.  Note the numerous new ties, installed in this track earlier this year.

Between the switch (just behind the camera) at the west end of the siding, and the Minas Warehouse Road crossing (out of sight around the curve), I counted 238 new ties under this main line track.  The only traffic along this track is the weekly freight train from Windsor, which travels over this stretch at slow speed, not much more than a brisk walking pace.



W&HR: Train to New Minas, 27 June 2007, epilogue

New Minas, Wednesday, 04 July 2007   10:19am

Empty Archer Daniels Midland tank car on the Frito-Lay spur at New Minas.



Scrapping the old Dominion Atlantic Railway main line track, April 2008
Destruction of a railway
This is the old Dominion Atlantic Railway main line track
as seen from the Middle Dyke Road connector overpass
about one km east from the Kentville railway station site

Photographed on 25 April 2008
ten days after the rail was pulled up and taken away for scrap

View large image 1200 × 1700 pixels


Also see:
Train to New Minas, 15 June 2007
Train to New Minas, 22 June 2007
Last Train to Windsor Junction, 2 Nov. 2010




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    http://ns1758.ca/rail/railways.html

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    http://ns1758.ca/tele/telephone.html

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First uploaded to the WWW:   2007 June 30
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